Chinese Dragons — Symbolism, Types, Culture, Legends, Art - the asian dragons

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Asian Dragons | AMNH the asian dragons


The dragons of East Asian legend have sweeping powers. They breathe clouds, move the seasons, and control the waters of rivers, lakes, and seas. They are linked with yang, the masculine principle of heat, light, and action, and opposed to yin, the feminine principle of coolness, darkness, and repose.

The Four Asian Tigers, Four Asian Dragons or Four Little Dragons, (in Chinese and Korean, only the "dragon" terms are used), are the economies of Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, which underwent rapid industrialization and maintained exceptionally high growth rates (in excess of 7 percent a year) between the early 1960s (mid-1950s Literal meaning: Asia's Four Little Dragons.

Chinese dragon, also known as East Asian dragon or Long, are legendary creatures in Chinese mythology, Chinese folklore, and East Asian culture at large. Chinese dragons have many animal-like forms such as turtles and fish, but are most commonly depicted as snake-like with four legs.They traditionally symbolize potent and auspicious powers, particularly control over water, rainfall, typhoons Simplified Chinese: 龙.

Chinese dragons are powerful and benevolent symbols in Chinese culture, with supposed control over watery phenomenon, e.g. summoning rain during a drought. Dragons are everywhere in China — in legends, festivals, astrology, art, names, and idioms. Dragons are seen as lucky and good — quite different to the evil, dangerous, fire-breathing dragons of most Western stories.Author: PKL.